Tag Archives: tree leaves

Cool spring

(May 8 11:30 a.m.)

Spring is already half-over.

(May 18 3:40 p.m.)

Which makes it odd that many of the tree leaves near home are still in early development or just budding, whereas trees in Biddeford and Portland have already bloomed.

(May 17 10:31 a.m.)

Of course, snow makes everything take longer.  (Not to mention, planted trees, flowers and grass are treated differently.)  It’s been cold for May— temperatures in the 40s (°F) versus “normal” numbers in the 60s.

Here are some photos of the progress so far.

(May 4 6:39 p.m.)

The leaves, of course, were buds.

Continue reading Cool spring

The leaves, the leaves

(Oct 9 12:16 p.m.)
Everyday, I’m shufflin’… walking through leaves. (Oct 9 12:21 p.m.)

It’s autumn, a.k.a. fall.  And the leaves are falling in large numbers.  And that means anywhere there’s a tree, they are sometimes landing on people like arms of a jacket; they’re not as small or dry as you might think this time of the year.

(From driver’s side window, hence the glare.) (Oct 6 1:36 p.m.)

What was mostly a green landscape began to gather browns, then reds…

(Oct 6 1:24 p.m.)
(Oct 9 12:22 p.m.)

…then yellows and oranges. Continue reading The leaves, the leaves

Verdant in May

(May 28 1:58 p.m.)

Living out in the woods (not quite, but bear with me), we’re pretty close to nature.  Lots of bugs during the summer, but also lots of fresh air— nice and “inviting” for a walk… when it’s not too hot.

Today, it only entered 60s Fahrenheit. …I don’t want summer, yet.

(May 28 1:58 p.m.)

Entering late spring, the leaves have gotten large.

(May 28 1:59 p.m.)

Even the leaves on the “porch plant” are full. Continue reading Verdant in May

Spring update

(May 18 3:23 p.m.)

Between sunny days and rainy days.

(May 21 3:23 p.m.)

It has gotten pretty green out there.  Compare to nearly two weeks ago:

“Porch plant” forming leaves. (May 10 1:53 p.m.)
(May 2 3:58 p.m.)

It also got a bit purple in the sky.

(May 3 5:03 p.m.)

So let’s start from the turn of May, and observe the progression from there. Continue reading Spring update

Lost in the woods

(Apr 21 2:53 p.m.)

Saturday marked the first day of spring where zero snow could be found on the property of our house.  Little bits lingered in the driveway for a while… and then— poof— it was gone.

That isn’t to say none remains in other places around these parts.

(Apr 21 3:10 p.m.)

So I ventured down the nearby trail to survey the current conditions of the season.  (And to get better photos than last time’s journey down the trail.)  The animals are out, and nothing made that more clear than a massive ruffling of leaves ahead to my right at one point… or more unclear as I couldn’t find any cause of the disturbance.

Down the southward path of the intersection, I presume (the longer, denser end), I saw a chipmunk to my left and a squirrel to my right… both of them scared of my presence, of course.
Continue reading Lost in the woods

Final Days of Summer (Part II)

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(Sep 13 4:37 p.m.)

Many of the ducks at Deering Oaks were wise to flee if I got anywhere close.  Large beings… potential predators.

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Blue-winged. (Sep 16 5:35 p.m.)

I watched some of the ducks fly from the hills to the water, gliding in as they landed, I guess using their legs as a source of friction to eventually stop.

According to Boreal Songbird Initiative, mallards (the “most abundant duck in the world”) are a member of the “dabbling duck group”— that is, they “feed by either tipping up or dabbling along the surface, capturing food and straining excess water through the lamellae (small boney tooth-like structures along the sides of its jaw).”

“When field feeding, Mallards generally feed around sunrise and again at sunset; however, in some instances, especially during a full moon, they will feed throughout the night. They will fly up to several kilometers to reach their feeding area, generally a crop field (e.g., corn, peas, barley).”

Friday the 16th was a full moon day… I thought I heard some voices or something outside the house when night fell.  I couldn’t actually tell what the sounds were, to tell the truth.  But back to the park… which wasn’t a crop field.

One mallard wasn’t so afraid of me. Continue reading Final Days of Summer (Part II)