Tag Archives: photos

Another day at the beach (Part II)

Just a taste of the mile-long arc of the beach, bordering on the Atlantic Ocean. (May 13 1:04 p.m.)

Last Saturday, for sake of mental health, I left the house.  It didn’t matter much where I went.  I landed in Crescent Beach that day, and twice returned.  Each time presented the opportunity to think about where things stand in life… and take newer, better photos.  Long story short, I still have some sand in my shoes.

(May 13 1:37 p.m.)

The conditions of the sky turned the color of the visible sun a little bluish.  It wasn’t cold, but an expression, “cold sun” came to mind. Continue reading Another day at the beach (Part II)

Another day at the beach (Part I)

Anjon’s fountain is up and running (some hours). (May 13 12:31 p.m.)

I needed to get away from the house.  Being housebound does not a healthy mind make.  The destination, I guess, didn’t matter considering I geared for the library but wound up at the beach, and didn’t mind.  Twice in three days… I did mind that.  It was a day of playing random music with the iPhone… and again wondering why the heck Bob Dylan made “Ring Them Bells”.

(May 13 12:15 p.m.)

I noticed the purple flowers are (or were) in style— as seen outside some businesses and neighborhoods, on the way to the beach, and even in our own town.  The above appear to be garden phlox… but I’m not sure.

Taraxacum officinale. (May 13 12:57 p.m.)

Dandelions were everywhere near the parking lot.

(May 13 1:02 p.m.)

Continue reading Another day at the beach (Part I)

Immature, but slowly pushing forward

Early rain. (May 12 7:55 a.m.)

Summer solstice is now only forty days away.  But spring here still has a ways to go.  The birds may be singing, and the seasonal clothes may be lighter, but the leaves and buds are still in their early stages.

A fibrous early start. (May 11 3:40 p.m.)

Soft greens, and even reds, immature plant blooms come in a variety of shapes and colors.  This time the iPhone camera is being used to capture the early state of the budding, particularly the “front porch plant” buds.  (Click a photo to enlarge.) Continue reading Immature, but slowly pushing forward

It’s a Bird-Eat-Bagel World Out There

Nature doesn’t waste food. (Apr 21 3:17 p.m.)

It’s been rain, rain and… clouds, mostly.  One day, someone left out a litter of bagels, and seagulls fought over them.

Nature doesn’t care if your pond’s supposed to be drained. (Apr 21 3:09 p.m.)

I’ve also grown pretty lazy, hence the lazy title for this post, if I do say so.  Till today, I hadn’t been doing my physio-exercises since my final appointment Tuesday (and even then I didn’t know I was seeing the orthopedic doctor, not the therapist, not the general doctor).  The rain interfered with the at-home exercises (the orange bands don’t do well with water— the first band is all stuck to itself now), and then… I was just plain tired.  (Two days spent programming.)

Male and female Anatidae. (Apr 21 12:24 p.m.)

Rain or shine, nature still does its thing.

(Apr 21 12:24 p.m.)

And I end up chasing it for photos.  I caught two ducks just outside the Portland Glickman library building, tucking heads amid light rain/mist.

(Apr 26 2:22 p.m.)

Exercises or not, the scenes made for some notable photos, of wet leaves and less usual colors that challenged my visual perception during the color correction process. Continue reading It’s a Bird-Eat-Bagel World Out There

Renewal

(Apr 14 12:15 p.m.)

We’ve been getting warm, sunny days now.  The skies have been so blue since Thursday that brown tree bark has a slight violet tint to the eye.  And according to the birds— out in full swing, braving rain showers— it is fully spring in Maine this week.  Since last posting, there have been days that felt like summer— how unexpectedly warm it got.

(Apr 14 12:13 p.m.)

The snow is almost gone.

(Apr 14 12:17 p.m.)

Along the nearby trail and its entrance you can see the wet remnants of the snow bank that lay here.  You can also make out a gap— the place I shoveled, drying sooner. Continue reading Renewal

Spring update

Squirrel! (Mar 22 3:16 p.m.)

I keep forgetting it’s spring.  It’s supposed to be the season that follows winter, the way the animals are out— the squirrels running about, hopping onto… snow banks.  Last Wednesday was incredibly windy.  I remember the car being pushed around.  I couldn’t be out walking in the park for long since the wind chill was freezing my face; I more jogged than walked that day.  It was also the day London was attacked… I’ll let the news reports speak for that.  Suffice it to say, Wednesday kind of sucked for many.

(Mar 27 11:46 a.m.)

As for today, it is raining.  And for that, it’s a good thing my mother bought me new shoes, recently, despite the fact that she did so against my wishes (I was there, saying ‘no’ repeatedly) and the fact that they don’t fit.  It’s days like this that test how waterproof said shoes are.  (Sigh, and boy, over $40 bucks of labor to be walked through mud repeatedly with my daily walk…)

(Mar 27 2:53 p.m.)

It shows that the rain has let up that there were mini-lakes when I went out just before noon for the first sixteen passes of my walk… and to find “junk” mail.  The above image had a large stream; now you can only see the effects of the water. (…And in trying to find a good word for said affects in the sand, I stumbled upon this article.  (Yeah, make our streams and waterways “great” again by allowing the dying coal industry to pollute them.  The ignorance is strong with this one.))

But instead of getting into politics… even though government tends to make or allow things to get worse no matter the stripes or colors… I will now reveal some of the fruits of my photography labor by documenting the progression of spring so far Continue reading Spring update

Turn of Spring

mere minutes into spring, and surprisingly color-accurate
Once again, I am surprised by the color accuracy of the iPhone camera… (Mar 20 7:00 a.m.)

It’s now six hours past vernal equinox in the northern hemisphere, otherwise known as the beginning of spring.  (At least on the calendar.)  Different kinds of flies have been hatching over the last few days (and, in seeing my share of nature programs, those that hatch too early die).  …And, according to my nose, there was a skunk was outside, last night.

Your dirt is showing. (Mar 20 11:32 a.m.)

Yes, there’s still a lot of snow left over from the season.  Lucky for Maine, blizzard Stella veered off into the Atlantic Ocean.  Other states had more “fun.”

Taxis and buses attempt to navigate around snow banks. (Timothy A. Clary / AFP/Getty Images)

But the white stuff is melting fast under direct sunlight.  Here’s the path hours after the storm ended (only three days prior):

(Mar 15 1:02 p.m.)

Not to mention (however, mentioning now) the final stretch of how much we had to shovel just to get the trash and recycling bin out of the snow, let alone the car out of the driveway…

Snow thankfully covering the license plate. (Mar 15 1:24 p.m.)

Stella contributed a height of 15¾”, measuring along the path, so it shows the drifts affected my measurements in the overnight post.  A peak of some 30,000 without power and a few traffic accidents over low visibility… the effects of the storm were more of a short-term pain in Maine.  Massachusetts got major flooding.

Crow. (Mar 16 2:16 p.m.)

Even on Thursday, the snow was visibly melting.  (It should be noted that the March 16 photos were taken with the other camera, so the quality is a bit lacking.)  At Back Cove, you can see the trees affected the snow drifts:

(Mar 16 2:27 p.m.)

And where there were no trees, it was an obstacle course getting my walk on at Back Cove given all the thick snow.

(Mar 16 2:30 p.m.)

And mud.

Those aren’t rocks near the water.  The rocks are partly buried in snow. (Mar 16 2:37 p.m.)
(Mar 16 2:46 p.m.)

The snowbanks at the Hannaford parking lot should give you an impression of what was plowed in southern Maine.

Objects in the photo are larger than they appear. (Mar 16 3:49 p.m.)

And in other lots…

(Mar 16 4:33 p.m.)

Yeah.

(Mar 20 11:33 a.m.)

Well, it’s a brand new day, and the beginning of a new, tiring work week.  And at the end of the week, March 26, British Summer Time will begin in Great Britain, putting us back into sync of five hours in separation, with our Daylight Savings Time, eastern U.S.

Considering I got only four hours sleep, I’m heading back to bed.  Until next time…

(12:46 p.m.)

Off to see the blizzard…

Hey, I just shoveled. (Mar 14 6:34 p.m.)

It wouldn’t be winter in Maine without more accumulation in March.  And maybe April.

(Mar 14 3:32 p.m.)

The blizzard moving through the northeast hit Maine Tuesday morning.  And according to a recent forecast, our county is apparently one of the few in the state to get the most snow.  And so, after being in bed until about 3 p.m. (I needed the sleep), I began taking photos, and shoveling, and measuring, first measuring with the shovel itself.

(Mar 14 3:33 p.m.)

Continue reading Off to see the blizzard…