Tag Archives: open mind

Revelations

(Compound Eye)

That doesn’t seem to work.
With so much buried and forgotten over time, so many things “mysteriously” fail to work, and many people “mysteriously” miss or dismiss work.  But so many people will just tell you off— go your merry way… and Wikipedia still appears to be in financial trouble.

Apocalypse: “to be seen”

As we approach apparent doom, so many things are revealed for what they truly are.  And yet, so many things are still hyped and misunderstood.  It takes so much time of hiding things to make such an apocalypse.  Needless to say (but it’ll be said), you should be reluctant to take someone who’s never experienced their claims at their word.

We see men these days off in their own little world, with their own little worldviews.  While it is true that what is closest to your person is usually what’s most relevant at a given moment, cutting yourself off from relating with your surroundings in ignorance… isn’t self-reliant, to say the least.  Every thought matters, including thinking you’re right—it changes things.  Closing yourself off changes you for the worse.

And so we have people that “protect” themselves by making shells, possibly making themselves prisoners of self.  What is true to you is still true to you; personal rules are just as important as universal rules.  There are truly different versions of the truth—and not just opinions, but different, justified realities.  But debt isn’t true; don’t dig a universal grave.

You also have the people who are hunkering down, preparing or thinking they’re prepared.  And a number of these people are related to these shelled men—not reaching out to them in the instance that they should.  Intelligence and stubbornness can go a long way at ignorance and promoting failure, but some people are trying to bottom out with no one to turn to.  (And if you change your mind, do a background check.)

Continue reading Revelations

Wonders of the Mind: Oliver Sachs in the New Yorker (2012.08.27)

It did not seem at all strange to me that a spider should say hello…

Oliver Sachs gives an in-depth history of a wilder side of his career, the side where he took a host of drugs.  In 1953, he crossed that threshold of staying objective through only reading about substance-induced experiences to objectively tripping on his own, writing about his psychedelic journeys and mentally-generated battle scene reenactments, with such scenes as to include his beloved indigo, fighting other colors.  And after taking too little one time, he often took way too much thereafter.  For the most part, the drugs he took then are either illegal or mixed with pesticides today. Continue reading Wonders of the Mind: Oliver Sachs in the New Yorker (2012.08.27)