Tag Archives: 2017

Well, that went fast

(Nov 14 2:20 p.m.)

The first snow of the season, here, melted quickly.  Turns out you don’t need many daylight hours for most of the white stuff to evaporate.

Tire tracks. (Nov 13 4:52 p.m.)

This is what it was like the night before.  It wasn’t deep enough to warrant shoveling, but the coating was a thick enough to paint the town white.  At least for a short while.

(Nov 13 4:44 p.m.)

Double exposure in the process of HDR can produce some interesting effects… A car’s brake light stands out — one exposure has the car / light / shadow; the next, no car.

Continue reading Well, that went fast

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I didn’t think “soon enough” would mean today!

(Nov 13 2:27 p.m.)

Yeah…

(Nov 13 2:21 p.m.)

It’s still coming down.

(Nov 13 2:21 p.m.)

And the temperatures are expected to remain low— as high as 48°F (9°C)— in coming days, freezing point at best overnight. So the snow (or “light sleet”), as far as I know, won’t clear soon. Of course, light rays cause evaporation, not heat… AccuWeather only gives us “sunny” on Friday.  Goody.

Autumn colors

(Oct 28 4:31 p.m.)

When you live around trees, you’re bound to see the transitions of their leaves, their fruit, etc. But even if you regularly engage in photography, you still may miss the best moments to capture the colors. Windows of opportunity can be short; I was lucky to capture some reds last year.

(Sorry for the HDR artifacting.) (Nov 4 4:45 p.m.)

This year, the reds hit brown by the time I got there.  (Of course, it’s November now.)

(Nov 5 1:00 p.m.)

A mixture of weather patterns makes for a mixture of colors. Continue reading Autumn colors

A candle-lit Halloween

(Oct 30 8:34 p.m.)

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents — except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets. —Paul Clifford, Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

(And, oh, were the winds intense, Sunday!  I was afraid it was going to leak again.)

As you can see by the title, this isn’t part III of Winds of Change (which, unbeknownst to me, was a title of a song).  That’s because the power has been restored.  (Yay!  I can finally write a complete post on the PC.  In theory.  And take a shower.)  It came back on just before noon, making the time “off” about 2 days and 11 hours.

(Oct 31 1:29 p.m.)

Now, this wasn’t ice storm of 1998 bad, which knocked us out for five days (worse for others) and tested our versatility in different ways.  (Winter in Maine.)  Being into electronics at the time, I wired batteries to lights taped to the wall, and even powered a CFL (via inverter).  The lack of heat was the bigger problem.  This decade’s problem: we have batteries in the living room we need to recycle.

(Nov 1 5:36 p.m.)

This week, it was: driving to the city for internet… and a chicken dinner.  And popcorn.  (Hey, my mother wanted popcorn.) Continue reading A candle-lit Halloween

Winds of change, part II

(Oct 28 6:31 p.m.)

So… I’m posting from the library again. (I’ll have to rush a bit again. WordPress is also not working properly— failing to add captions, Javascripts that hang— for some reason. Frustration galore.) The lights are still out at home. But at least with WiFi at the library building, I can send photos directly to the media library… which will be needlessly larger and lack color correction, but you can get a glimpse of what I’ve seen.

Continue reading Winds of change, part II

Winds of change

(Oct 8 12:33 p.m.)

Well, we finally had a real storm in the northeast. Power was knocked out to over 240,000 in Maine alone. It’s mild compared to the recent hurricanes in the south. (Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are still struggling.) But it affected us directly. I got to see, firsthand, not only downed lines, but the effects of the downed wires: dark traffic lights, a closed road, and a closed half of a road, with tree debris still hanging on several cables.

We lost power last night. In fact, I’m typing this at the library. I have no photos because I took the older phone (which is actually connected and needed charging)… and I can’t find the thumb drive for any other photos. If that drive is lost, I’m SOL for now.

The winds are rose again today, and the tide has been going out. The nearest clouds are visibly moving. The winds are harsh enough that clusters of wet leaves have been tossed around violently, into the streets as you’re driving, and some sea gulls in the air find the winds hard to predict. Entry doors to the library are slightly ajar sometimes, pulled open.

Metaphorically, the winds are high in the news as well. Indictments have been made in the Russia collusion probe, as you may have read. Paul Manafort and Richard Gates, 12 charges. Tony Podesta to step down from the Podesta Group. House of Cards, canceled after someone accused Kevin Spacey of sexual abuse (and then some), after the downfall of Harvey Weinstein and the #MeToo campaign that came with it. Plenty of guilty people in the news, and more resignations to follow.

Well, I gotta go. Time restrictions. Until next time…

(Oct 14 6:07 p.m.)

Fall update

(Oct 14 3:01 p.m.)

Autumn.  The leaves are turning red, and the air has cooled.  The air is also drier, considering a little “pink in the sink” from my sinuses.

(Oct 7 2:47 p.m.)

There are no shortages of places with decorations— pumpkins on display, even in our living room (the fake, plastic light-up kind, but still).  Stores make it clear that Halloween is right ahead.  (In the U.S., anyway.)  I was also made aware, by my friends, of the Mid-Autumn festival (observed in China and Vietnam), and Diwali (Hindu)— with plenty of yellows and oranges— comprised of candles and fireworks in the sky, and massive amounts of flying lanterns… Okay, so there were no flying lanterns Continue reading Fall update

The fall

(Sep 15 6:15 p.m.)

It’s the last week of summer in the United States.  The autumn colors are showing more.  Yellow and red, some falling around me.

How the overall environ. has treated the “porch plant.” (Sep 15 6:18 p.m.)
(Sep 1 6:59 a.m.)

Fresh leaves collect with the brown.

Blue feather. Closer to a mountain bird than a blue jay. (Sep 2 6:35 p.m.)

Acorns accumulate. Continue reading The fall

Summer update

(Aug 12 1:47 p.m.)

So I’ve been falling behind on the blogging front again.  I attribute it to the national news, the negativity and lack of confidence in my voice even though I have enough I’d like to say.

Gotta post some day, so here goes.

Last Saturday wasn’t particularly eventful… in Maine, I mean.  I was invited to a BBQ, but declined because it entailed more sitting around doing nothing.  It’s kind of funny because, despite not going, I saw tiki torches— something you’d see at barbecues— anyway, with the news.  (Not much was funny about what happened in Virginia.)

Participation or no, I needed to get out of the house.  And it goes without saying: most of the opportunities in life are not going to be online.

(Aug 12 1:47 p.m.)

First stop… and without much choice (because I can’t drive): timely photos of Crescent Beach, and with the better camera.  As you can see, the beach was populated.  (With people.)

(Aug 12 2:08 p.m.)

A park ranger at the entryway toll booth asked whether I was native to the state.  Maine gets a fair amount of tourism.

Chipmunk! (Aug 12 1:33 p.m.)

I saw a few animals before I even put my feet onto pavement.  (As always, click to enlarge a photo. …And sorry for the traces of bird poop on the windows.) Continue reading Summer update