Movies… on TV… in Movies

Add a new title to the Movie of the Weak list

Ice Soldiers (2013).

It’s flawed, by the end it squandered the limited budget it had.  The premise: genetic engineering at its finest, making a new breed of supersoldier… in the 1950s-60s, Cuban missile crisis— Russian “supermen.”  I mean, come on.  The technology was not there; it’s hard to say the technology is even here, today.  And these literally raping and pillaging supersoldiers are reduced to and called throughout the film as “white guys.”  That’s (kind of) what they do, comments Adam Beach.

Unlikely event upon likely, expected event, upon uncharacteristically unlikely event, Ice Soldiers is formulaic.  It got 4.1/10 on IMDb.  Well, at least it didn’t load itself horrible with action clichés like Soldiers of Fortune.

And for something better…

TCM guest host through Friday: Anthony Bourdain, picking movies that… feature food.

One of those picks: a movie that Roger Ebert once said, ‘if there is any movie without clichés, it would be My Dinner with Andre (1981).’  Two guys— one of them Wallace Shaun, meeting up at a table, eating and talking of broad subjects for two hours— sort of a real conversation on life.  (The film is actually 111 minutes long.)

One of the subjects discussed in this single-scene film still resonate today: people were zombies back then, too.  As if you have to take everybody to Mt. Everest just to get them to feel.  And how the ‘zombification’ comes to be: All this reporting of crime and chaos (and a list of examples); the exploitation and alteration of what’s important, giving the audience the impetus of control where they have none.

Unable to change anything in this distortion of responsibility, people become “passive and impotent.”  I know that from experience!  Likewise, it’s a “dream world,” where people appear to be speaking in code— reserving each other from the world.  The web, which turned 25 yesterday or so, has only brought us closer together… on superficial territory.

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